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I Remember

I Remember

by Georges Perec
Translated from the French by Philip Terry
Introduction and notes by David Bellos

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Product Details

Verba Mundi

Softcover
ISBN: 978-1-56792-517-3
Pages: 176
Size: 5.51" x 8.75"
Published: 2014
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An affectionate portrait of mid-century Paris and a daring pointillist autobiography by Georges Perec, a master of postmodern fiction. The text consists of 480 numbered statements, all beginning identically with “I remember” — all limited to pieces of public knowledge, brand names and folk wisdom, actors and illnesses, places and things (“I remember Hermès handbags, with their tiny padlocks”). As playful and puzzling as the best of Perec's novels, I Remember began as a simple writing exercise, and grew into an expansive, exhilarating work of art: the image of one unmistakable and irreplaceable life, shaped from the material of our collective past. For this edition, Perec's 480 memories, sometimes obvious, sometimes obscure, have been elucidated and explained by critic, translator, and Perec biographer, David Bellos.
Georges Perec
Georges Perec was a French novelist, filmmaker, documentalist, and essayist. He was a member of the Oulipo group. His father died as a soldier early in the Second World War and his mother was killed in the Holocaust, and many of his works deal with absence, loss, and identity, often through word play.

Philip Terry
Philip Terry was born in Belfast and has taught at the Universities of Caen, Plymouth, and Essex. In addition his acclaimed translations from the French, he has edited several collections of poetry and short stories and written a novel that was shortlisted for the 2013 Goldsmith Prize. He is currently Director of the Centre for Creative Writing at the University of Essex.

David Bellos
David Bellos is Meredith Howland Pyne Professor of French Literature and Professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton University. In 2005, he won the first Man Booker International Prize for translation for his translations of the Albanian author Ismail Kadare. He holds the rank of Officier in the Ordre national des Arts et des Lettres and an honorary membership in The International Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters.